This is Aaron Rester's blog:

Field Notes from the Digital Prairie

Thursday, March 20, 2008

Amitabh 2008: Yes, he can.

He's back.

Amitabh (he needs two names about as much as Jesus does) has had many jobs over the years: Angry Young Man, (disgraced--er, retired) Member of Parliament, original host of the Indian version of "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?", Bollywood's Elder Statesman-cum-Answer to Chuck Norris... and now, future Prime Minister of the United States. You might remember the abortive 2004 campaign by the guys over at Badmash to get him elected president (I still regret not buying an "Amitabh for America" t-shirt), but they're apparently changing tactics this time around by making him run for a different office entirely. When Gabbar Singh calls at 3am, isn't this the man you want answering the phone? He makes McCain look like Ralph Wiggum.

Of course, to me, Amitabh will always be Anthony Gonzalves, erstwhile drunk and Christian hero of possibly the greatest movie ever made. In honor of the upcoming Easter holiday, please see this clip as proof that while Barack Obama may sound like Lincoln, only Amitabh can pull off the stovepipe hat.

(Want to hear my remix of this song? Check out my music page or my GarageBand page.)

Thursday, March 6, 2008

Actually, Make That 30 Seconds of Fame

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about being mentioned on one of favorite podcasts, Freelance Radio. Well, I am feeling the Freelance Radio love once again -- "Walk On" by the Lost Cartographers was selected as the outro music for Episode 10. Thanks again to the crew over at Freelance Radio for the shout-out and for all their excellent work.

Monday, March 3, 2008

Designing With Your Ears

On a recent episode of Design Matters, Petrula Vrontikis said something that, well, made my ears perk up. When host Debbie Millman asked whether she preferred working by hand or working on the computer, Ms. Vrontikis responded that she works "mostly... with [her] ears." Listening, she reminds us, is the root of design work -- listening to what your client says, and translating that into a piece of visual work, is what good designers do.

Of course, what your client says and what they think they want may be two very different things, but we'll leave that for another day.